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How to get Apple One subscriptions and save money

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iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12.

Todd Haselton | CNBC

Apple began rolling out its Apple One subscription bundles on Friday. They package together a bunch of of Apple’s subscription services, such as Apple Music, Apple TV+, Apple Arcade and iCloud storage and can save you money over paying for them separately.

Apple One also represents a new way for Apple to boost subscriptions and bolster its services business, which generated $14.55 billion — up 16.5% year-over-year— during Apple’s fiscal fourth quarter. And it could help attract more people to use services they might not have otherwise, like Apple Arcade.

Three plans are available:

  • Individual costs $14.95 per month with Apple Music, Apple TV+, Apple Arcade and 50GB of iCloud storage. That’s a savings of $6 a month over buying them separately.
  • Family costs $19.95 per month and includes 200GB of iCloud storage and support for up to six people to use the subscriptions. It will save you $8 a month.
  • Premier costs $29.95 per month and adds News+ and Fitness+, a set of workout classes for Apple Watch owners, along with 2TB of iCloud storage. It works with up to six people and will save you a whopping $25 a month over buying the services separately.

Here’s how to sign up:

  • Open Settings on your iPhone.
  • Tap your name at the top of the screen.
  • Tap Subscriptions.
  • Choose “Get Apple One.”
  • Select the plan. Each comes with a one-month free trial.
  • Click ‘Start Free Trial’ at the bottom of the screen.


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My expensive new earphones promised to upgrade my life. Then they broke | Romesh Ranganathan | Life and style

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I have been known to be wildly inconsistent with my reactions to expensive items. I will happily overpay for a pair of jeans, and later that same day bemoan the state of the world when an ice-cream costs a fiver, despite both items having a similar manufacturing cost.

My biggest blind spot is headphones. I have become convinced that I need a pair for different situations. So I have a pair for the gym (barely used, obviously), a pair for everything else, and then a pair of wireless earphones for situations in which I don’t feel like wearing headphones (or something; I can’t remember how I justified it to my family).

It’s the earphones that are now causing me grief. I had a pair of the kind that many people have, from that company that we all know manufacture things ethically and from whom there’s absolutely no way your phone was made by a slave. I chose these overpriced earphones for no other reason than to be able to ask my wife where I had put them, over and over again.

Then the Really Ethical Company brought out a new pair. These are apparently much better than the version I had because they sit in your ear more comfortably and the sound quality is far improved: two qualities that were very much trumpeted about the pair I already had, but which are now apparently utter trash and a crime against audio.

Like an idiot, I decided I needed them and ordered a pair. I was so excited about being able to put the new earphones, that were almost identical to the ones I had, into my ears, so that I could finally hear my music properly and experience levels of comfort that I could previously only dream of with the awful pieces of shit I was using before.

I now had the issue of what to do with the old earphones. I went with the genius idea of giving them to my son, achieving the double aim of making me feel better about myself, while also showing my son that I love him enough to give him anything I have that has been rendered obsolete. (He also receives a pair of earphones for doing nothing. And so his ongoing journey in learning to appreciate the value of things is once more compromised by his father.)

The earphones arrived and I pretended that they were an improvement. Not to anyone else; I just kept reassuring myself that there was a noticeable difference, and that it would have been ridiculous to struggle on with the previous pair. There was absolutely no way that this was a waste of money, and further evidence of our manipulation by a capitalist society into believing we need to consume needless things in order to force us to keep working. (I heard that on a podcast, and while I was upset by the message, I was impressed at how crystal clear the words sounded.)

That lasted for about two weeks, until the earphones mysteriously stopped working. I put them in on the train, they refused to boot up, and I was left with the horrifying reality of being alone with my thoughts for an hour. I got home and immediately contacted the Really Ethical Company for a replacement and, as I half expected, they said something along the lines of how they’re only supposed to last about two weeks until the new iteration is released. I would have to send them off to be repaired, and so I am now without any earphones at all.

My life has continued almost completely unaffected, which highlights the stupidity of the purchase in the first place. This might well be my first step in unplugging from the Matrix. Either that, or I’ll just buy the new version as soon as they launch.


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Amazon saved $1 billion in travel expenses due to the pandemic

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Nikol Szymul staffs a reception desk at Amazon offices discretely tucked into a building called Fiona in downtown Seattle, Washington on May 11, 2017.

Getty Images

Amazon has saved nearly $1 billion in employee travel expenses this year, as the coronavirus pandemic kept employees from hopping on airplanes.

“There’s some benefits going on right now,” Amazon CFO Brian Olsavsky said on the company’s third-quarter earnings on Thursday. “Travel ground to a halt.”

Internal travel expenses will likely resume “at a later date,” but they may not rise to the same level that they reached in the past, Olsavksky added. He also said the company saved some money from reduced marketing costs.

Early on in the pandemic, Amazon told its more than 1 million employees to avoid all non-essential travel in the U.S. and abroad out of concern for their health and safety. Additionally, many countries have prohibited or restricted U.S. citizens from entering, as U.S. coronavirus cases continue to rise.

Despite the cost savings from travel and marketing, Amazon says expenses are increasing in the current quarter. Coronavirus-related costs are expected to rise to $4 billion in the period, up from $2.5 billion last quarter.

The company said fourth-quarter operating income will range from $1 billion to $4.5 billion, with about $4 billion of costs tied to Covid-19, up from $2.5 billion last quarter. The bulk of those costs are related to “productivity headwinds” from increased social distancing, along with testing employees for the coronavirus and acquiring protective supplies.

WATCH: Amazon beats top and bottom line in Q3


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