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This is how to tighten and firm skin around your neck

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Ever since the lockdown has been imposed on us, more and more people have started taking time out to care of their skin. There are so many people out there dedicated to firming and tightening the skin on their faces. But then, why should you treat your neck any differently? The skin on your neck is more fragile than the skin on the rest of your body, which is why it’s all the more important to take good care of it. Here are a few tips that will help.

– Stop looking down at your phone all the time: The constant flexing of your neck creates a whole new set of wrinkles. In an age, where phones have become an extension of our bodies, there’s only so much one can do to stop yourself from getting more wrinkles. There are some exercises to tone your neck as well as to release tension. Practice those and intentionally try to look down less at your phone. Hold your phone at your eye level at all times to avoid moving your neck downward.

– Moisturise your neck each day: Just like you can’t go without moisturising your face and applying body lotion to your arms and legs, you shouldn’t skip the neck too. It prevents and minimizes the appearance of neck lines. You can very much use the same formula as that on your face, but if you really wish to dedicate yourself to the cause, it’s worth investing in a necks-specific cream.

– Wear SPF on your neck every single day: Doesn’t matter if it’s sunny or gloomy outside, your skin needs to be protected at all times. By this, we don’t just mean your face but your neck too. The sun is the biggest offender when it comes to early signs of ageing. Damage from ultraviolet light causes laxity of the delicate neck tissues which leads to sagging of skin and enhancing of the lines.

– Cleanse your neck before you go to bed: It sure takes a little bit of your time, but it is extremely important just like cleansing your face is. If you don’t shower at night, the micropollutants and free radicals from the day can end up causing premature ageing of the skin on your neck.

– Try a skin-resurfacing treatment on your neck: If you want to get any treatments done, chemical peels, micro-needling and lasers resurface the skin. These help in minimizing lines and tightening the neck by inducing collagen production.


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The dried flower craze: how a summer of cancelled weddings led to a big new trend | Retail industry

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Name: Dried flowers.

Age: Old.

How old? Very. Brightly coloured flowers were found in Egyptian tombs, so about 4,000 years old. Ornamental nosegays became popular in the 16th century.

Can any flowers be dried? Some lend themselves to the process better than others. Hydrangeas, salvia and xeranthemum are all good.

Don’t they just wilt and wither? Not if you do it right. Flowers can be simply hung in a ventilated area, dried with hot air in a special drying chamber, or dried using silica gel. In 1813, the process of freeze-drying was introduced to the Royal Society in London by a chap named William Hyde Wollaston.

Yeah, fascinating. But why are we talking about it now? Valentine’s Day? Because it’s hot.

Freeze-drying? NO! The whole process, as well as the dried flowers themselves. They’re very in.

What, those dusty old things you might find on the mantelpiece in a B&B in Bexhill-on-Sea? Time to rethink that, and them.

Why? Because sales of dried flowers have, well, bloomed in the UK during the pandemic.

Bloomin’ heck. Stop it. But yes, up 115%.

Any reason? Bex Partridge – a florist and the author of Everlastings: How to Grow, Harvest and Create With Dried Flowers – says that many British flower farmers, faced with Covid-cancelled weddings, suddenly had to figure out what to do with their blooms.

So they dried them? Exactly.

And has the fresh flower industry dried up? No. Unsurprisingly, the global floral industry, which relies on global supply chains and fully open borders, has been hit hard. But the fact that supermarkets have remained open has been a lifeline.

Presumably Brexit is not going to help in the UK? Fresh flowers aren’t generally improved by spending time in warehouses and lorry parks. The former Tory minister John Redwood says we need to take back control of our flower production, obviously. Along with cheese and veg and all the rest of it.

Yay, English roses all round. Also daffodils, shamrocks and thistles (until they rejoin).

Or dried flowers. Exactly. “It’s not either or,” says Partridge. “It’s just another way to use flowers.” Try to think beyond the dust and the chintz. And you don’t have to spend loads of money: get out there, find some interesting seed heads, teasels, old bracken, whatever, and mix them with some fresh flowers.

Are you telling me this is going to be my new lockdown interiors thing? Well, you’ve got a kneely chair, and the bed desk, and painted the kitchen sage green because you read that was the thing to do; dried flowers is the next logical place to go.

Do say: “Loving the delicate poppy heads against the wispiness of the grasses, and the bold purple statice, my early Valentine …”

Don’t say: “I’ve got a dust allergy, in the bin with those, Grandma.”


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Weight loss story: "I followed Intermittent fasting"

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For working professional Rochit Mehrotra, weight gain meant battling a lot of negativity and losing out on confidence. Over the years, problems got worse and he had trouble doing even the most simple tasks. That’s when he decided to give his everything and lose weight. Read on to know the diet and workout he followed to lose 27 kilos.

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Bridal looks of Bollywood beauties

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Bridal looks of Bollywood beauties

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