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Tamannaah's closet is full of hot dresses

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She is one of the most popular actresses down south and her chic style has played a big role in making Tamannaah Bhatia’s so famous. While she’s always dressed to perfection, her dresses deserve a special mention!

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Working from bed? Here’s how you can still look professional | Fashion

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Dressing for work, if lockdown is forcing you to work from bed, is a dance between comfort and mindset. A nightie suggests you’ve given up, but lip gloss is too much (plus it’s a nightmare if you get it on your sheets). So, how to dress when you don’t want to get dressed? Can you get away with a dressing gown, and what about a hoodie? Follow these tips for bed-based video-call dressing, and you can hunker down in your chrysalis and emerge from it warm, transformed and, hopefully, still employed.

Say goodbye to your pyjamas

No one is suggesting you wear a pinstripe suit to work from bed. But the once salubrious act of wearing your pyjamas all day loses its novelty as some of us march into month 10 of working from home. Daniel Biddulph, a graphic designer who worked from home way before everyone else did, put me on to airline pants. That is, those neutral-coloured sleep-suits-in-bags they give people on first-class flights. Free of those tell-tale pyjama giveaways – lapels, piping, fun checks – yet just as comfortable, they are pyjamas that are designed to be worn in public, planes in effect being dormitories in the sky. Assuming you don’t fly first class, and your support bubble is lacking a pilot, try eBay, where they sell (bagged and unworn) like hot cakes. Biddulph likes Lufthansa’s, which are dark blue. I prefer the British Airways offering, in black cotton polyester.

Dress like your bed

Cocooned in your new “working landscape”, you may soon struggle to differentiate between bed and bedclothes. Is that porridge on your sheet or porridge on you? Did you just use a cushion as a mousepad or is that actually a mouse? Instead, make an ally of your bed by wearing it. Although, be warned, not all blankets are designed to be worn. Frances Kozen, associate director of the Cornell Institute of Fashion and Fibre Innovation, says: “I own a wonderful alpaca Peruvian poncho, but it is definitely an outdoor garment, being without sleeves and a stiffer wool.” As for her wool Colombian ruana, “it’s better, but the open sides make it trickier to wrap up in”. Lightweight woollens, such as her Loki blanket, are good for curling up on the sofa, “but are not machine washable”, she says, with regards to the porridge incident above. Blankets in fleece and plush are the easiest to wash, and Snuggies and Comfies are designed for bed-working, but none of these are good for the environment. Kozen prefers her ankle-length bathrobe when doing business from bed, which brings us nicely on to the next item.

Embrace the all-day dressing gown

Inspiration for the 24-hour robe comes from two different sources: Noël Coward on the stage and Mary Beard, Zooming from home. Coward, an early “bedfluencer”, wore silk robes as part of his louche, playboy brand, says Brad Rosenstein, the curator of a forthcoming exhibition, Noël Coward: Art & Style, at Guildhall art gallery in London. “The dressing gowns came to typify the style of his theatrical world … [and] he pursued that image offstage too.” For Coward, they were elegant and flattering but the more “eccentric ones” (see a gold silk one from Bronzini, known as the Vegas) were a means of political expression. “As a gay man at a time when homosexuality was criminalised in Britain, the boldly patterned silk dressing gowns could speak safely in ‘camp code’ while also being fashionably appealing to straight audiences,” says Rosenstein.

Beard wears a necklace with hers when she is teaching from home at Cambridge. “It’s guaranteed to trick them into thinking that you really have got properly dressed – because who wears a necklace with their dressing gown?” the academic and broadcaster said recently.

As someone who has worn a gown to a funeral and a wedding, both times without detection, I have realised that dressing gowns are all about context. Worn without its tie, it’s an open wrap dress. Worn over clothes, it’s a cardigan. Worn over pyjamas, it’s very much a dressing gown, though for Coward “the naughty implication of the bedroom” can be a plus.

Remember that hoodies are the new suit

Once upon a time (early 2020) wearing a hoodie to work outside the San Francisco Bay Area would have seemed ludicrous. Post-pandemic, a wardrobe of tracksuits and T-shirts has become fully acceptable. Devin Kohli works in the City of London but, like many of his colleagues, has long ditched the suit and tie. “I’m a venture capitalist … so I wear jeans and a hoodie.” So, too, does Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, and Ken Leung’s character, Eric, in the HBO hit Industry. His purple hoodie screamed maverick, outsider and self-appointed mentor, in that order. Hoodies, it seems, are the new white collars, signifiers of informality, however performative (Zuck) or studied (Eric) that may be. By wearing one in bed, you not only look conference-ready, you actually look successful. Who would fire someone like that?

Always wear a sports bra

The pandemic has made much of our wardrobe redundant (RIP tight jeans), but it has yet to kill off underwear. Sports bra sales are up 150% at Marks & Spencer. This could be about enclothed cognition (even if you’re not actually jogging, wearing a sports bra means you could feasibly start any second), but more likely, many of us are now so used to leisurewear that this naturally extends to undergarments. No matter what your bed-working attire, underwear is essential. Given that cameras and colleagues are a knotty business (just ask the former New Yorker writer Jeffrey Toobin), a bra or boxers should at least prevent any job-ending slip-ups.


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The lack of sex desire is due to stress, claims study

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You’ll notice that the times when you feel the least motivated to have sex with your partner is on the rise. There is a certain uneasiness every time you think of sex.

Most of us relate the lack of sexual desire to eminent sex problems. Upon knowing this, such individuals refrain from finding possible romantic partners because they think they won’t be able to provide them with sexual satisfaction. But what most of them do not know is that while it may not be a physical problem, some of them are rooted in emotional and psychological reasons that have had an impact on their sex life.

What causes lack of sexual desire?


To get answers for such an imminent lack of sexual desire, researchers have conducted analytical studies to prove that one’s surroundings play a huge part in arousing one’s desire. Experts suggest that one part of the brain processes our emotions, that includes our sexual responses as well. It pumps fear, aggression, love, sadness, despair, adoration and all sorts of emotions one feels. This part is particularly responsible for awakening your sexual desire, indirectly.

To feel aroused, one requires the perfect environment, where there’s likely to be less stress, more affection and subtle hints of high eroticism. An environment that dwells on stress and despair can be a huge blow on couples who are encouraged to have sex. Even if a person puts in the effort to whisper sexual sweet nothings in their partner’s ears, they will probably not want to do it. The current situation of the ongoing pandemic and the pressure of work-from-home contributes to the formation of a highly stressful environment, where sexual innuendos can’t even get someone to do it.

And so, maintaining a perfect surrounding is essential if you want to get it on with your partner. A little steamy action in between the sheets need a peaceful environment, where stress is long forlorn and there are some romantic candles placed on the side of the bed, or sweet, soft and seductive melody is being played. That’s when two partners would agree to forget their stressors and make love to each other.

Chronic stress and its effect on our sex lives


Another reason why most of us do not feel the desire to have sex is because ‘chronic stress’ restricts us from getting out of the stress cycle, which is something that we forever find ourselves in a loop. And so, when the stress hormones released in our body get built up continuously without any release, it makes us emotionally sick and slowly pulls us in a labyrinth of despair. Eventually, we start to resent sex and pleasure.

So, what can be the solution to all this? Less stress? But this is something most of us can’t let go, given our current situations. And so, experts suggest that one has to be very open to the idea of sex and initiate activities that can replenish your urge for sexual desire. Activities like Yoga, meditation, simple workout exercises gets the muscle working and your sexual urge enlightening. Further, if one differentiates the negatives and positives in their sexual experiences, it can help them understand better, what exactly they would like to indulge in. This narrows down your perspective on what arouses you and what doesn’t. If you try eliminating the negatives accordingly, you will find a much easier way to deal with the problem of lack of sexual desire. Every person has to work towards finding a middle ground in their sexual relationship where both partners can equally enjoy themselves.


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Working from bed? Try these stretches to see off aches and pains | Health & wellbeing

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Working on a laptop in bed all day can be ruinous for your shoulders, back and overall wellbeing. “Your back won’t be supported very well,” says Fiona Houston, a physiotherapist and the founder of Physio Inverness. “It will be slumped. Plus, if your legs are stretched out in front of you, you’ll be putting strain through your nervous system.” She explains that this runs from your brain to your spinal cord, all the way to your toes. “By sitting in bed with your legs out in front of you, and your head tilting downwards, at a laptop screen, you’re stretching that system continuously. It’s actually one of the things we would ask our clients about, to see if people are likely to have issues with their nerves.”

Houston advises a mixture of stretches for your back. “Sit on a chair and rotate your shoulders forwards and backwards,” she says. “Yoga poses such as the child’s pose (where you sit on your heels and push your shoulders to the ground, head facing the floor) or the cobra pose (where you lie on your front, hands and legs flat on the floor, and arch your head and shoulders off the ground) will help your joints move. These stretches are quick and easy to do, and easy to access online.”

The personal trainer Lavina Mehta urges at-home workers to snatch moments to get active during interminable Zoom calls. “If you can switch off your camera,” she says, “do a quick three-minute workout while you’re on the call.” To loosen up tense shoulders, grab a resistance band or an old pair of tights, and practise shoulder flossing: hold the band or tights loosely between both hands, and raise your arms to the ceiling, while maintaining tension in the fabric. Now bring the band down, so your palms face your thighs, and then raise your hands up, back over your head, and bring them down again, so they’re parallel with your bum. Your neck will thank you for it. Mahta says: “I say to everyone, shoulder floss every day, just like you should floss your teeth every day. Set an alarm every day, so you don’t forget.”

Poses such as the child’s pose will help your joints move ...
Poses such as the child’s pose will help your joints move … Photograph: Getty/iStockphoto

If you are stuck in bed and feeling stiff, get on all fours and “do a cat cow,” says Mehta. “This is brilliant when you’ve been hunched over for ages. Tuck your tailbone towards your chest, then do the opposing movement, and lift up through the chin, to get a stretch coming all the way to your belly button.” She’s also a fan of the perennial yoga favourite, the downwards dog, to get the blood flowing again.

When you work from bed all day, your body rapidly loses muscle mass. “Within just a few days of bed rest,” says Houston, “even a young, fit person will lose muscle strength very quickly.” She advises that people working from bed attempt to factor some strength training into their workouts. Not with weights, necessarily – they’re harder to get hold of than a Covid vaccine, with most dumbbells out of stock online since the first lockdown in March. “Bodyweight exercises are great,” says Houston. “Squats, press-ups or even dead-lifts with a rolled-up towel work well, to help stretch out the lower back.”

Mehta is also a fan of body weight training: she suggests holding a plank for as long as you can bear, tricep dips on the back of a chair, and walking lunges, and glute bridges, where you lie on the floor, palms flat on the ground, knees slightly bent, and push your hips up towards the ceiling. “Glute bridges and tricep dips are great,” Mehta says, “because they’re really going to strengthen your glutes and your back.”



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