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Out to play: the best things to do around the UK this week | Travel

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City Art Centre, Edinburgh

Two new exhibitions are launching for the reopening of City Art Centre on 12 September. Looking beyond the art deco and jazz of the era, Bright Shadows: Scottish Art in the 1920s aims to contrast artworks that deal with the losses of the first world war with pieces focusing on what was a new age of possibility. And City Art Centre at 40 includes highlights from the city’s collection, from 17th-century portraiture to contemporary abstract works. Mimi’s Bakehouse cafe on the ground floor has also reopened, serving all-day brunch and pastries.
Entrance to exhibitions free with allocated time slots booked in advance, edinburghmuseums.org.uk

Liverpool Theatre Festival, Liverpool

St Luke’s Church, the site of Liverpool Theatre Festival 2020


The ruins of St Luke’s, known as “the bombed-out church”, will be hosting nine days of open-air live performance from 11-19 September, including musical theatre, drama, cabaret, family shows and comedy. The programme features the one-man comedy Swan Song, John Godber’s Shakers, standup from Laughterhouse and Deathly Confessions, and oral history project and theatre piece Sweet Mothers, plus fantasy pantomime for younger audiences (tickets from £10). Drinks and pizzas are also available onsite via an app.
liverpooltheatrefestival.com

Truman’s Social Club, London

Truman’s Social Club, Walthamstow


Joining Walthamstow’s craft beer scene, known unofficially as the Blackhorse Beer Mile, historic east London brewer Truman’s has transformed a derelict space into a taproom with a large, twinkly beer garden. The site is also home to Zero Sushi and Mexican Fried Chicken and hosts live music on weekends. There are plans to open the huge adjacent space indoors later this year as a community hub for culture and food, including a new brewery and events space for film screenings and live music.
Booking advised, £5pp reservation deposit redeemable against drinks, trumansbeer.co.uk

Paragliding, County Antrim

Paragliding in County Antrim


These paragliding sessions can take participants soaring up to 2,000ft (600 metres) on their first tandem flight. Heights depend on weather (and courage) using just the natural lift of the wind to take to the skies in a free-flying aircraft. Aerosports UK in Ballynure runs one-day taster course for beginners (£120), including kit training, safety briefing and canopy-control techniques, followed by solo or tandem flights. The season can run through winter and hill jumping locations vary, with the Antrim hills, the Causeway Coast and the Mourne Mountains in County Down all options – depending on wind direction.
aerosports.co.uk

Pub In The Park’s Drive In Garden Party, Knebworth

Pub in the Park’s Drive In Garden Party



Photograph: Edd Cope

Kaiser Chiefs, Soul II Soul, Gabrielle, Basement Jaxx are some of the acts coming to Knebworth House for the Drive in Garden Party this weekend (11-13 September, £47pp). Each vehicle parks in a pre-booked spot with its own “garden”, which includes space for picnic blankets and dancing. Walk-in spaces are also available for those without a car. Local caterers include Kerridge’s, the Mariners and Atul Kochhar – orders can be placed in advance or during the event. Next week the party heads to Tunbridge Wells’ Eridge Park, with a similar line-up, plus Keane and Squeeze.
driveingardenparty.com

Sea kayaking, Anglesey

Explore the natural playground of the north Wales coast with Sea Kayaking Wales’ courses, which run in autumn and winter – including full-day sea kayaking and half-days on Llyn Padarn in Snowdonia (£80/£55pp). Sessions include equipment training, boat-handling skills in both sheltered and open water, and rescue skills. For intermediate and more advanced seafarers, there are one-to-one coaching sessions and bespoke dynamic water courses.
seakayakingwales.com

Slices of Time at Now Gallery, Greenwich

Created by Emmanuelle Moureaux, a vast web of technicolor paper numbers sit suspended in the air at this gallery, each representing a “slice of time” (free with a pre-booked ticket, until 27 September). Following other large-scale installations in Tokyo and Paris, this is the architect-artist’s first in the UK, and is inspired by its location close to the Greenwich meridian. Moureaux’s work has been influenced by the layers and colours on the streets of her long-time home, Tokyo, and by the Japanese concept of shikiri – dividing or creating space with colours. Also on show at Now this month is interdisciplinary collective Resolve’s site-specific installation (14-20 Sept) accompanied by a performances, workshops, screenings and talks challenging ideas of proximity and how it shapes local communities.
nowgallery.co.uk

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Which national parks are separated by the M6? The Weekend quiz | Life and style

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The questions

1 Slithy and mimsy are the first examples of what words?
2 Rinka the great dane was whose ill-fated pet?
3 Which national parks are separated by the M6?
4 Which king is said to be a 41st-generation direct descendant of Muhammad?
5 The tympanic membrane is another name for what?
6 Which French explorer travelled on the Calypso?
7 “Battling” Barbara Buttrick was a pioneer in which sport?
8 What type of limestone landscape is named after part of Slovenia?
What links:
9
Chile’s Villa Las Estrellas and Argentina’s Esperanza Base?
10 Survivor; Californication; Come Dancing; Heartbeat; Life On Mars?
11 John (1209); Henry VIII (1538); Elizabeth I (1570)?
12 Scylla; Leviathan; Kraken; Jörmungandr?
13 India; Indonesia; Maldives; Mauritius; Nepal; Pakistan; Seychelles; Sri Lanka?
14 Sergeant; Nurse; Teacher; Constable?
15 Heidelberg; Flores; Luzon; Denisova?

Journey’s end... the Calypso
Journey’s end… the Calypso. Photograph: Pascal Couillaud/AFP

The answers

1 Portmanteau words (in Lewis Carroll’s Through The Looking-Glass).
2 Norman Scott.
3 Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales.
4 Abdullah II of Jordan.
5 Eardrum (myringa).
6 Jacques Cousteau.
7 (Women’s) boxing.
8 Karst.
9 Civilian settlements in Antarctica.
10 TV series that share their titles with songs: Destiny’s Child; Red Hot Chili Peppers; the Kinks; Buddy Holly; David Bowie.
11 Excommunicated monarchs.
12 Mythical sea monsters: Greek; Jewish; Norse.
13 Countries with rupee (or variant spelling) as the currency.
14 First four Carry On films.
15 Discovery locations that gave their name to early hominins.


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Here’s what every parent expects from their child, based on their zodiac sign

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Becoming a parent sure does come with a lot of responsibilities. However, it is not devoid of expectations and hopes. Every parent, no matter how liberal or free-spirited they are, anticipates something positive from their children and/or awaits them to achieve something great in life. While the kind of belief you place in your child may differ according to your personality, here is what you as a parent expect from your kid, as per your zodiac sign.


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How to make your own butter – recipe | Food

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Out-of-date (but not mouldy or funky-smelling) cream makes the most wonderful butter, transforming an ingredient that’s destined for the bin into the ultimate comfort food, while also extending its life.

The first time you make butter, you understand what it actually is – and how easy it is to make. At food festivals (remember those?), there are often butter-making workshops for kids, providing thick cream to pour into jars and then shake until it splits into the butter and buttermilk. It really is that simple.

Child or adult, I highly recommend making your own, not least because homemade butter is delicious, and a welcome reminder why the quality of our ingredients matters. Plus, it’s always satisfying to make your own essentials from scratch.

Buttermilk is a byproduct of the butter-making process, and is itself very useful in cooking: drink it straight, like kefir, or use in baking.

How to make butter

Making your own butter is the easiest thing in the world. My nephew will tell you so, and he started making it himself when he was just six. Young or old, it is a rewarding endeavour that I’d highly recommend. Sour or culture the cream first, and you will have a mind-blowing fermented product that can cost as much as £10 to buy ready-made. You will also have the added bonus of buttermilk to drink or bake with, too.

At least 200ml full-fat, whipping, heavy or double cream (cultured, if you prefer)
1 tsp sea salt per 200ml cream (optional)

Pour a minimum of 200ml room-temperature, full-fat cream into a suitable-sized mixer, blender or food processor bowl. Whizz until clumps of butter form, then pour off the buttermilk (save this to drink or cook with later) and gather the butter solids into a ball; at this stage, if you like, knead in a teaspoon of salt per original 200ml cream. The butter is nice and creamy eaten just as it is, but will keep for only a couple of days. To extend its shelf life, put it in a bowl of ice-cold water and knead into a tight ball, which will turn the water milky. Change the water and repeat until the water stays clear after kneading. Pack the butter into a clean jar, or pat it into a block with a wet flat spatula or butter pat, and wrap in unbleached parchment.


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