Connect with us

Entertainment

Oscars reveal new diversity requirements for best picture nominees | Film

Published

on

The Oscars are raising the inclusion bar for best picture nominees, starting with the 96th Academy Awards in 2024.

In a historic move, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Tuesday laid out sweeping eligibility reforms to the best picture category intended to encourage diversity and equitable representation on screen and off, addressing gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity and disability.

The film academy has established four broad representation categories: on screen; among the crew; at the studio; and in opportunities for training and advancement in other aspects of the film’s development and release. To be considered for best picture, films will have to meet two of the four new standards, the Academy said.

Each standard has detailed subcategories as well. To meet the onscreen representation standard, a film must either have at least one lead character or a significant supporting character be from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group; at least 30% of secondary roles must be from two underrepresented groups; or the main storyline, theme or narrative must be focused on an underrepresented group. According to the academy, underrepresented groups include women, people of color, LGBTQ+ people or people with disabilities.

The best picture award, which is handed out to the producers of a film, is the one category every film academy member can vote for. This year, the South Korean film Parasite became the first non-English language film to win the award. All other categories will be held to their current eligibility requirements.

“The aperture must widen to reflect our diverse global population in both the creation of motion pictures and in the audiences who connect with them,” said David Rubin, the Academy president, and CEO Dawn Hudson in a written statement. “We believe these inclusion standards will be a catalyst for long-lasting, essential change in our industry.”

The second category addresses the creative leadership and crew composition of a film. In order to meet the standard, a film must have either at least two leadership positions or department heads be from underrepresented groups and at least one be from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group; at least six other crew members be from underrepresented racial or ethnic groups; or at least 30% of crew members be from underrepresented groups.

The third category deals with paid internship and apprenticeship opportunities as well as training opportunities for below-the-line workers, and the fourth category addresses representation in marketing, publicity and distribution teams.

Films will submit confidential inclusion standards forms, but they will not be required for best picture hopefuls for the 94th and 95th Academy Awards.

The inclusion standards were developed by a taskforce led by academy governors DeVon Franklin and Jim Gianopulos and in consultation with the Producers Guild of America. They took into account diversity standards used by the British Film Institute and the British Academy of Film and Television Awards.

These changes will not affect the 93rd Academy Awards, although the academy has had to make alterations because of Covid-19’s effects on the movie business, including pushing the ceremony back two months to 25 April 2021 and allowing films that debuted on streaming services to be eligible for best picture.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Entertainment

Most Jaw-Dropping The Boys Season 2 Moments

Published

on

By

This entire montage was heavy, heartbreaking, and brilliant. It made a blatant callout to our current times and displayed how ultra-patriotic attitudes and media breed prejudice and xenophobia, proving that although The Boys takes place in an alternate world, our world isn’t really that different.


Source link

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Time review – poetic documentary about a family torn apart by prison | Documentary films

Published

on

By

The idea that the mass incarceration of African Americans is in effect a modern form of slavery has been explored in several powerful documentaries, ranging from Sam Pollard’s 2012 Slavery by Another Name (from Douglas A Blackmon’s book) to Ava DuVernay’s Oscar-nominated 13th (2016). But while others have tended to concentrate on statistics, history and politics, director Garrett Bradley goes the other way in her film Time, conjuring an almost expressionist account of the experiences of a family torn apart by prison, examining the toll that jail time takes on those outside the prison walls.

Despite headlines at the time, there was little Bonnie and Clyde glamour to the bank robbery that landed Fox Rich (AKA Sibil Fox Richardson) and her husband, Robert, in prison in the late 90s. Both accepted responsibility for the crime, an out-of-character reaction to the collapse of a business on which they had pinned all their hopes. Yet while Fox took a plea deal and served three-and-a-half years, Robert fell foul of terrible legal advice and wound up sentenced to 60 years without parole.

Such legal details, however, are not the focus of this extraordinarily intimate portrait of the Rich family, in which Bradley, who won the directing award in the US documentary category at Sundance, moves back and forth through two decades of separation, drawing on an extensive archive of home-movie footage that Fox created to show Robert the life he was missing inside, and that was waiting for him when he got out, something she never doubted would happen.

Through these videos, which are beautifully interwoven by editor Gabriel Rhodes with more recent footage (all rendered in strangely cinematic black and white), we watch young twins Freedom and Justus grow from boys to men, inspired by their mother, who somehow juggled raising six sons with becoming a businesswoman, an activist and a powerful advocate for prison reform.

Eschewing explanatory title cards or on-screen text, Bradley creates a tone poem that ebbs and flows in hypnotically lyrical style, dexterously shuffling images from disparate periods to create something unified and immersive. Through this time-shifting montage, we are encouraged to share in the experiences of the indomitable woman whom Bradley met while making the 2017 New York Times Op-Docs episode Alone, a stylistically similar short film she considers the “sister” to this feature. “This system breaks you apart,” Fox says in Alone. “It is designed, just like slavery, to tear you apart.” Yet in Time it’s an almost superhuman sense of togetherness that rings through, a refusal to bow down, to be broken or defeated.

For all its urgent verisimilitude, there are moments when Bradley’s documentary seems closer to a drama, not least in a scene of remarkable backseat intimacy, sensitively shot in slow-mo by Nisa East, one of three credited cinematographers. There’s even a self-reflexive sequence of Fox taping a promo for her car dealership that teases away at the boundaries of performance and personality. But such playfulness never obscures the truth of Bradley’s vision or the honesty with which Rich confronts her own circumstances.

Worth noting too is the superb use of piano music by Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou, the subject of Kate Molleson’s 2017 BBC Radio 4 doc The Honky Tonk Nun, which ripples with bluesy ease throughout the movie, combining the same air of soulfulness and spirituality that lies at the heart of Bradley’s film.


Source link

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Huracán review – Rocky-like portrait of a cage fighter on the edge in Miami | Thrillers (film)

Published

on

By

There’s a Rocky-like energy about Huracán, a film that combines a gritty feel for the unloved urban landscape with a psychological-thriller plot and a setting in the ultraviolet world of mixed martial arts. Star Cassius Corrigan even looks a bit like the young Sylvester Stallone, but he’s gone one better: Corrigan is starring, writing and directing in this, his feature debut.

He plays Alonso Santos, a troubled young man in Miami who is diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder by a sympathetic court-appointed therapist named Isabela (Yara Martinez). Whenever Alonso feels threatened, his aggressive alter ego “Huracán” emerges. And since he’s on parole, facing homelessness and making his living in the (almost) anything-goes arena of MMA – AKA cage fighting – that’s fairly often.

Isabela takes it on herself to help Alonso by guiding him to the childhood source of his trauma. There’s no guarantee of success, since her methods are experimental and her professional boundaries are vague. Corrigan’s performance also teeters on the line between vulnerability and menace throughout, making for plenty of entertaining suspense.

While most therapists would probably balk at this depiction of their working practices, and the use of serious mental illness as a plot device is cliched and questionable, yet Huracán succeeds as a portrait of a man on the edge. It has a Loachian way of eliciting naturalism from non-actors (real-life Muay Thai champion Grégory “Cheetah” Choplin is particularly effective as Alonso’s tough coach), and, on Alonso’s lonely jogs through the streets of Miami, the camera finds the same tropical twilight quality that Oscar-winner Moonlight so beautifully captured.

He’s not yet a heavyweight, but in the (almost) anything goes arena of film-making, Corrigan has clearly got what it takes.

• Huracán is in cinemas from 23 October.


Source link

Continue Reading

Breaking News

Shares