Connect with us

Technology

Instagram Reels Review: It’s Like TikTok

Published

on

On Wednesday, Instagram launched possibly its most anticipated US update since stories or the dog filter: its TikTok competitor, Reels.

And, I gotta say, Reels sure looks a lot like TikTok.

Of course, this all couldn’t come at a better time for Instagram or its parent company, Facebook. President Donald Trump has begun waging an all-out war against TikTok, which is owned by a Chinese company called ByteDance. Last weekend, Trump threatened to ban the app from the US over, citing concerns about what the company is doing with American data.

In the middle of the drama, Instagram had the serendipitous luck (although, I put nothing past Mark Zuckerberg) of dropping what is essentially a TikTok clone. (Apropos of nothing, emails released cited in a congressional hearing last week revealed that Facebook bought Instagram in the first place in order to neutralize a competitor.)

It really is an uncannily similar product. I got access to Reels on Monday ahead of the US public launch and immediately was kind of amazed at how TikTok-y Reels felt.

With the tap of a button, you can scroll through Reels almost exactly like you scroll through your For You page, falling into the same kind of mindless, addictive scroll-hole that has made TikTok a favorite pandemic time-waster of millions.

The early access was only open to select publishers, influencers, and journalists so there weren’t as many of the random teens, hilarious videos, and funny animals that you would see on TikTok, and the pool of content was much smaller. However, a lot of the culture seems to have made the jump, with a lot of the same memes, songs, and sounds I normally see on my For You page popping up on Reels.

In fact, as I scrolled through Reels on Tuesday, I saw an Ashley Tisdale video that I had literally just seen on my Fo You page on TikTok. A lot of people just seem to be uploading old TikToks onto Reels, which makes a lot of sense, tbh.

Eva Chen, Instagram’s fashion director, re-created a huge TikTok trend with her daughter as her first foray into Reels. And when I wanted to show it to my followers, all I had to do was hit share, and I could upload it to my Instagram story.

Publishers like Bravo have also readied for the upcoming launch by helpfully uploading viral moments for people to act out, which is a super-popular trend on TikTok.

Of course, TikTok has plenty to offer that Reels does not. I am admittedly horrible at creating content (that’s why I report on it instead) and can’t speak in depth to how the TikTok video-creating experience stacks up to Reels. (I have attempted making videos on both platforms, and they feel about the same to me in terms of how user-friendly they are.)

Popular TikTok features, like the ability to “duet” with other videos, aren’t available on Reels, and TikTok has, of course, built up its own culture of memes, sounds, and creators that will be hard to completely imitate. TikTok also has its famed algorithm for discovering videos, which will be difficult to match.

However, my main takeaway from Reels is the same one that, ultimately, led to me eventually stop using Snapchat once Instagram launched stories. It’s just so easy to have everything in one place.

With Reels, I can easily toggle from my stories to my Explore page and then to TikTok-style videos all in one app. I don’t have to build up a whole new following on TikTok, and I can see what people I am already following on Instagram are posting. If I see a funny video I want to share with my followers, I can share it easily to my stories without having to switch apps. I could see influencers, many of whom have launched TikToks in recent months to keep up with the trends, just posting to Reels instead and no longer worry about building a new fanbase on a new platform.

Of course, there are plenty of people, especially teenagers and young adults, who use TikTok as their main social media app and won’t be tempted to switch over. But for those who primarily use Instagram and/or Facebook, the ease of Reels will make it an extremely enticing alternative.

It’s just convenient to have all your followers, and all your content, in one place. And Instagram, as always, has just made it easier to spend even more time on it.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Technology

Don’t expect an ‘explosion of cases’ from China’s antitrust push: Professor

Published

on

By

Jack Ma, founder of Alibaba Group, attends opening ceremony of the 3rd All-China Young Entrepreneurs Summit on September 25, 2020 in Fuzhou, Fujian Province of China.

Lyu Ming | China News Service via Getty Images

SINGAPORE — China’s latest antitrust push will not likely lead to a “sudden explosion of cases” against online platforms, according to legal expert Angela Zhang.

Her comments came after shares of Chinese tech giants like Alibaba, Tencent and Meituan were rattled earlier in November following the release of draft rules by Beijing that defined for the first time what constitutes anti-competitive behavior.

“It’s a bit early to tell what is the next step the government is going to take but … at least this is kind of signaling a trend of stricter regulatory enforcement over these tech businesses,” said Zhang, who is associate professor of law and director of the Center for Chinese Law at The University of Hong Kong.

Commenting on the potential impact of the draft anti-monopoly rules, which are currently in a public consultation stage until Nov. 30, Zhang told CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia” on Monday that there are two factors to keep in mind.

We shouldn’t expect … a sudden explosion of cases against these online platforms.

Angela Zhang

associate professor of law, Center for Chinese Law at The University of Hong Kong

Firstly, such investigations typically involve a “lengthy process” and Chinese agencies could take a long time to complete an investigation, Zhang said.

“The last big case that they brought against Tetra Pak took almost five years to complete,” she said referring to the Swedish packaging firm that was slapped with a fine of about $97 million by Chinese regulators over anti-monopoly practices.

Secondly, Chinese agencies are “very thinly staffed,” she added.

“We shouldn’t expect … a sudden explosion of cases against these online platforms,” Zhang said, as it would “consume a lot of time” and human resources for government agencies to bring any big cases against the tech giants.

As for competitors, the professor said they may pursue their cases in court, though so far no plaintiff has successfully launched an antitrust case against the online platforms. It also “remains to be seen” how judges will interpret the issues.

Still, she admitted that many details “remain to be finalized” and it is still not known when the new rules will actually be announced. Even when the new rules are released, they will only be “guidelines” and won’t change existing regulatory frameworks.


Source link

Continue Reading

Technology

Restaurant tech start-up Toast worth $8 billion in employee share sale

Published

on

By

Restaurant tech start-up Toast worth $8 billion in employee share sale