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Iconic TV Crossovers On Disney Channel And Nickelodeon

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Let’s relive these precious moments.

1.

“That’s So Suite Life of Hannah Montana” (That’s So Raven, The Suite Life of Zack & Cody, and Hannah Montana)


Disney

This is probably one of the most memorable Disney Channel crossovers because it combined some of our favorite characters from the mid-2000s. I mean, London Tipton and Hannah Montana fighting over who gets to wear one of Raven Baxter’s dresses that she designed??? Iconic.

2.

The Jimmy Timmy Power Hour (The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius and The Fairly OddParents)


Nickelodeon

Ah yes, that time Jimmy and Timmy get stuck in each other’s animated world. I never knew I needed to see a 2D version of Jimmy Neutron and a CGI version of Timmy Turner, but Nickelodeon knew we were all curious and gave it to us anyway.

3.

Wizards on Deck With Hannah Montana (Wizards of Waverly Place, The Suite Life on Deck, and Hannah Montana)


Disney

Here’s another time that Hannah Montana and Suite Life characters crossed paths — only this time, they’re on a boat and Alex, Justin, and Max Russo from Wizards of Waverly Place are there too. Plenty of wild events ensue — like Max having a crush on London, and Cody trying to impress Bailey by getting tickets to a Hannah Montana concert.

4.

“iParty With Victorious” (iCarly and Victorious)


Nickelodeon

Remember that episode when Carly and Tori were dating the same boy, and then they both find out? And let’s not forget the end of the episode when all the drama is over, and the casts of iCarly and Victorious perform “Leave It All to Shine” — a mashup of their theme songs.

5.

Rugrats Go Wild (Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys)


Paramount / Courtesy Everett Collection

This family vacation gone wrong gets VERY interesting when the Rugrats and their parents end up stranded on an island — and run into none other than the Wild Thornberrys. One of my favorite moments in the movie? That scene when Angelica and Debbie have a bonding moment jamming out to “Should I Stay or Should I Go” while recklessly driving through the jungle.

6.

“Rufus” (Lilo & Stitch: The Series and Kim Possible)


Disney Channel

Lilo & Stitch: The Series has a few crossovers with other Disney Channel shows, like American Dragon: Jake Long and The Proud Family, but this episode with Kim Possible is my personal favorite. Because who would’ve thought we’d ever see Stitch being kidnapped by Dr. Drakken, and then Lilo and Kim teaming up to rescue him? I loved every minute of it.

7.

“Ghost Story” (Rugrats and Aaahh!!! Real Monsters)


Nickelodeon

If you’re an OG Nickelodeon fan, you can certainly recall this Rugrats and Aaahh!!! Real Monsters episode, right?? When I was a kid, the Aaahh!!! Real Monsters characters low-key freaked me out, but seeing the Rugrats in this episode happened to put a smile on my face.

8.

“Take This Job and Love It” (Hannah Montana and Cory in the House)


Disney Channel / Courtesy Everett Collection

I’ll never forget when Hannah’s bodyguard, Roxy, becomes the bodyguard for the president — aka President Martinez from Cory in the House. And then Lilly pretends to be Hannah to give dance lessons to the president’s daughter, Sophie — who’s a huge Hannah Montana fan, of course.

9.

“The Hoo, I’m Wild Wild West” (Cousin Skeeter and Kenan & Kel)


Nickelodeon

Definitely one of the most iconic crossovers from the late ’90s. THE comedy duo Kenan and Kel with THE one and only puppet Skeeter? Now, this was the collaboration I needed to see. It still has a special place in my heart.

10.

“Helen Back Again” (Victorious and Drake & Josh)


Nickelodeon

Of course, we can’t possibly forget when Helen from Drake & Josh got a new job as the principal at Hollywood Arts, aka the performing arts high school in Victorious!!! Helen brought her brilliant humor as usual and even sang in the episode (and she has some serious vocals, BTW).

11.

Big Time Beach Party (Big Time Rush and SpongeBob SquarePants)


Nickelodeon

Ahhh, that time Patchy the Pirate from SpongeBob showed up in this Big Time Rush TV movie. This moment was more random than anything else — but it was memorable. So here it is.

12.

Good Luck Jessie: NYC Christmas (Good Luck Charlie and Jessie)


Disney Channel

If you ever watched Jessie and/or Good Luck Charlie, you may remember this crossover that united these two shows for a Christmas special. Long story short: Teddy and PJ visit New York City, and Teddy meets Jessie and Zuri on the subway. In true Disney Channel fashion, there are lots of twists and turns. And lots of Debby Ryan.

13.

“Fly Boy” (The Fairly OddParents and Danny Phantom)


Nickelodeon

Remember that time Timmy Turner made a wish to turn into a fly to watch a horror movie behind his parents’ back, and an actor in the movie was a character from Danny Phantom? Knew that face looked familiar.

14.

“Austin & Jessie & Ally All Star New Year” (Austin & Ally and Jessie)


Disney Channel

My Disney Channel phase had been over by the time this Austin & Ally and Jessie crossover aired, but I’d say it still deserves to make the list. Like, who could forget that Jessie got to perform a song with Austin?

15.

“iStart a Fan War” (iCarly, Zoey 101, and Drake & Josh)


Nickelodeon

Last but not least, in this crossover episode, the iCarly team have a panel at Webicon (aka iCarly‘s version of comic con), and fans start a “war” shipping Freddie with Carly or Sam. During this Creddie vs. Seddie drama at the convention, the audience includes some iconic characters from other Nick shows: Stacey from Zoey 101 and, right behind her, Gavin — that guy who worked at the Premiere movie theater on Drake & Josh. And who were our other special guests? None other than Craig and Eric, also from Drake & Josh.

What other TV crossovers from your favorite childhood shows do you remember? Let me know in the comments below!

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LX 2048 review – James D’Arcy lets rip in forgettable dystopian mish-mash | Science fiction and fantasy films

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James D’Arcy is one of those good-looking, highly competent British actors who is steadily and widely employed, but seldom gets cast in the main role – apart from, say, playing Edward VIII in Madonna’s memorably panned biopic WE. This quirky, low-budget science-fiction feature gives him a chance to let rip (maybe just a smidge too much at times) as Adam Bird, a depressed middle manager for a technology firm. The American accents everyone puts on, even though most of the cast is British, suggests that events are supposed to be taking place somewhere in North America, though the cityscape, with its glowing monorail and CGI skyline, is pretty obviously a set – in this case a studio in Vilnius, Lithuania. That barely matters because the characters hardly ever go outside, and if they do it’s mainly at night because the sun is now so hot and toxic.

Writer-director Guy Moshe has mashed together some solid and recently fashionable dystopian conceits, touching, for instance, on the existential dilemmas of cloning, or the lovelessness of always-online society. However, after a promising start featuring lushly brutalist production design – all concrete, 3D printed plastic and recessed lighting – the concepts start to feel like a less interesting Black Mirror episode, and the last act is a mess.

But D’Arcy really goes hell for leather as his character starts to unravel: he faces betrayal from his wife (Anna Brewster), a Mephistophelian inventor (Delroy Lindo) and eventually his own facsimile. Jagged editing with explicatory flashbacks doesn’t make it any easier to parse, and the confinement to a single set for most of the second half evokes experimental fringe theatre, not necessarily in a good way. However, the scene where Adam shags a rubber sex doll will live on in the memory long after you’ve forgotten what the film was actually about.

• LX 2048 is available on digital platforms from 25 January.


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"Bridgerton" Star Phoebe Dynevor And Director Julie Anne Robinson Explained How Sex Scenes Were Filmed And It's Pretty Intense

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“It was more intricately choreographed than our dance routines.”


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Hear me out: why Maid in Manhattan isn’t a bad movie | Jennifer Lopez

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2002 was a bumper year for romcoms. Banking on the commercial safety of a saccharine love story, studios splashed out on everything from the Nick Hornby adaptation About A Boy to Gurinder Chadha’s Hounslow tale Bend It Like Beckham, Sandra Bullock facing off against corporate shill Hugh Grant in Two Weeks Notice, matrimonial romp My Big Fat Greek Wedding, and Reese Witherspoon’s nostalgic Sweet Home Alabama, to name just a few titles.

This was a golden age for will-they-won’t-they tales set to the backdrop of the new millennium, burgeoning digital literacy and predictable scripts that ensured that they, in fact, always did. Nestled amongst these releases was a critically derided, commercially dominating cultural relic: Maid In Manhattan.

The film stars Jennifer Lopez as a maid working in a luxury Manhattan hotel, who finds herself falling for a senatorial candidate (Ralph Fiennes) – who in turn has a soft spot for Richard Nixon – via a farcical case of mistaken identity. Lopez keeps up with her adopted, socialite guise until her secret is revealed and much hand-wringing ensues. Fiennes ultimately decides that her lowly status as a maid is good enough for him; he can share his wealth anyway. Over the closing credits we see that Fiennes has won his seat and Lopez has now transitioned from maid to an employer of maids.

Lopez was at the height of her popularity and power when the film was released, having broken through with the title role in Selena in 1997, then played alongside George Clooney in Steven Soderbergh’s Out of Sight, before starring in hit The Wedding Planner with Matthew McConaughey, as well as reaching number one in the US charts with her second album J.Lo – a nickname coined by director Oliver Stone on the set of his 1997 film U Turn. Lopez’s money-making credentials were solid. Fiennes, meanwhile, brought an outsized theatrical gravitas to his role, following Oscar-nominated turns in Schindler’s List and The English Patient.

From the lofty, hindsighted position of this century’s increasing political turmoil and structural inequality, their pairing in the film now becomes an excellent satire on new millennium naivety – an attempt to shoehorn fairytale tropes into an unruly and unbalanced modern society.

In the film’s moral universe, the only place for women of colour is in the bowels of the hotel, performing menial work, and the only way one of the more ambitious of their ranks, Lopez, can progress is by mistakenly posing as a white socialite and ultimately romancing her way out of her social class. Above all, Fiennes is implicitly praised for his willingness to elevate her into his ranks, to be seen with someone like a brown maid in public. And in the film’s climactic scene, Lopez’s son argues that his mother should be given a second chance, making a clumsy comparison to rehabilitating Nixon after his impeachment in the process. If nothing else, we know by now that impeachment should not be so easily glossed over …

Even the film’s poster is absurd. Lopez sits on a bench in front of the Manhattan skyline in her maid’s uniform – a visual signifier of her servitude – while she daydreams in an infantilised pose an image floating in the sky of her in a diamond necklace flanked by Fiennes, him showing more than a glimpse of his future turn as Voldemort through an unnerving smirk.

With the hindsight, too, of Lopez’s scene-stealing turn in 2019’s Hustlers, here we see her acting chops in embryonic form, while the supporting cast props her up in impressive fashion. The late Bob Hoskins provides paternal authority as butler Lionel, Stanley Tucci is on reliably camp form as Fiennes’ adviser Jerry and the late Natasha Richardson is the gleefully villainous socialite Caroline Lane. All the while Fiennes holds court as the smiling, yet ominously ambitious senatorial candidate.

In a year of popular romcoms that at least attempted to incorporate the nuances of reality – immigrant experiences in Bend It Like Beckham and My Big Fat Greek Wedding, depression in About A Boy, southern anachronism in Sweet Home Alabama – Maid in Manhattan stands out as a curious, absurdist fairytale. It deserves another watch because of its fantastic ignorance to the context of its making. It is the unexpected death knell of the romanticised American dream onscreen; it is the last gasp of old-fashioned romcom idealism in a different world. It tells us, in the most glowing of terms, that you can’t hope to work your way into a better life any more, that in fact the odds are so stacked against you if you are a single, working-class mother that all you can hope for is a chance, mistaken encounter to be swept off your feet. And then, you too can become a profiteering business owner, enacting the means of your own subjugation on those less fortunate. Happily ever after, indeed.


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