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Heart Injuries From Coronavirus Are Real, Doctors Report

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Coronavirus infections can cause heart problems in patients, according to experts — yet another unexpected, serious consequence of COVID-19 that has been underlined by reports of such injuries among college football players.

On Thursday, Penn State’s football team doctor Wayne Sebastianelli walked back earlier comments that 30% to 35% of Big 10 football conference players who had COVID-19 also had heart inflammation, telling ESPN the rate was actually lower, around 15%. (Penn State also told ESPN none of its players have the condition.)

The fumbled figures attracted a lot of attention, but didn’t surprise epidemiologists, like Columbia University’s Mitchell Elkind, president of the American Heart Association, who told BuzzFeed News that from 20% to 30% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients seem to have symptoms of heart injuries, including myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle caused by viruses.

“Some of these long-term consequences of a coronavirus infection are only now coming into focus because enough time has passed by to see them,” said Elkind, particularly among “long-hauler” patients still suffering all sorts of lasting injuries from the pandemic virus.

As of Friday, more than 6.1 million cases of COVID-19 and nearly 187,000 deaths have been recorded across the US, leaving many recovered patients with long-term injuries with an unknown resolution, because the disease has been around for less than a year. Initially seen as a respiratory disease, COVID-19 also strikes the heart, kidneys, and brain, as well as causing blood clots and a bewildering array of other long-term symptoms in some patients.

“It seems that COVID-19 inflammation of the heart is different from classical myocarditis,” which causes an irregular heartbeat and shortness of breath, said cardiologist Christof Burgstahler of Germany’s University Hospital and Medical Faculty Tübingen, whose team reviewed some of the first cases. It’s too soon to tell whether that’s good or bad for patients, he added by email.

Myocarditis raises the risk for sudden cardiac death in elite athletes, according to the American College of Cardiology, explaining the attention around the Big 10 football players, a conference that last month canceled its fall football season. Essentially, football players and other patients will have to be monitored by doctors for signs of irregular heartbeat and blood markers showing signs of continuing damage to heart muscle. Some myocarditis patients require medication to maintain a regular heartbeat.

Other viruses — including some flus, for example — also cause heart inflammation, seen in perhaps 1% to 5% of patients, Elkind said, but the incidence in COVID-19 seems significantly higher, perhaps 10% to 15% even in patients without major symptoms.

“This is a serious, deadly disease that does more than just kill people, but leaves others with potential long-term consequences they may have to live with for a long time,” he said.

“This is all just one more reason to wear a mask, wash your hands, take care of your neighbors.”

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India hailed as ‘Immortals’, Australia under fire after Gabba stunner | Cricket News

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BRISBANE: India’s cricketers were hailed as ‘Immortals’ on Wednesday following their record-breaking win in Brisbane, but some former greats called for chastened Australia to make changes.
India thrillingly achieved their 328 target with just 18 balls left on the final day to win the four-Test series 2-1, the highest successful run chase at Australia’s “Fortress Gabba”, where the hosts had been unbeaten for 32 years.
“It was the day when The Irrepressibles became The Immortals,” declared News Corp’s veteran cricket writer Robert Craddock.
“The day when Fortress Gabba was stormed by a group of cavalier raiders who kicked down the draw bridge, stole the crown jewels and raced off into the late afternoon sunshine towards hysterical fans who will cherish the memory forever.

“Take it all India. You deserve it.”
India’s refusal to play for a draw, which would have been enough for them to retain the Border-Gavaskar Trophy, was lauded.
“The outcome was a revelation: Australia pressed for victory because they had to, India because they wanted to, and the result was a fitting climax to one of the most extraordinary series of all time,” wrote Gideon Haigh in The Australian newspaper.
Most were united in their praise of India, but there was also criticism of Australia.

“I think there’ll be a huge fallout from this,” said leg-spinning great Shane Warne, commentating on TV, noting that India had been without their entire frontline bowling attack through injury.
“There’s not too many times that you lose to the second or third side,” he said.
“Tactics will come into question. Bowlers will come into question. People’s spots in the team will come into question.”
Mitchell Starc, who bowled 16 wicketless overs for 75 on the final day, came in for particular criticism after taking just 11 wickets in the series, with some saying captain Tim Paine had lost faith in the left-arm paceman.

“I know that your impact bowlers are meant to come in and have a little burst, but there just doesn’t seem to have been the trust that Mitchell Starc’s going to do the job,” said former Australian wicketkeeper Adam Gilchrist.
Former Australian captain Mark Taylor said: “You can have Starc when he’s bowling at his best, but I think we need some subtlety in our bowling.
“We need someone who can swing the ball a bit, someone who can ask questions around lbw or bowled, not always looking to bounce batsmen out or get them caught behind,” Taylor said.
Australia should look to bowlers such as the South Australian fast-medium pair Chadd Sayers and Daniel Worrall, who would add something different to the current three-pronged pace attack, said Taylor.
“There’s a lot of talk about Australia not being aggressive enough, but I don’t agree with that,” Taylor said. “I think we need to find some subtlety in our bowling attack.”
Some said that Australia should be thanking India for their skill and courage in coming to play the series at all during a global coronavirus pandemic.
“We mightn’t be thanking you in five years when you’re still whisking away matches from under our noses, but thanks for now, and take a bow,” said the Sydney Morning Herald’s Greg Baum.
“By series end, few Australians would have begrudged you whatever spoils you took home.”


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‘Finisher’ Rishabh Pant redeems himself with ‘natural’ game | Cricket News

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Team India finally embraces mercurial southpaw’s ways; Keeper overcame disappointment of World Cup semi-final and pressure of filling Dhoni’s shoes
“This is the biggest thing in my life right now,” an emotional Rishabh Pant said while receiving the man-of-the-match award on Tuesday. In the last two years, no one in Indian cricket has been subject to the kind of vilification Pant has endured. With the match-winning unbeaten 89, he set the Gabba and world cricket alight. But he also did set a record straight.

His dismissal in the 2019 World Cup semifinal had become a reference point for his critiques. MS Dhoni’s retirement meant he was expected to live up to the lofty standards of finishing games. Every time he failed to do so, the knives would come out. On Tuesday, he finished a game that will go down as one of the best in the history of Test cricket. For all his flamboyance, typical of the T20 generation, Pant has always yearned for success in Test cricket.
“He was a bit depressed because of the way he got out after he got set in the World Cup semifinal. He realized he missed out on an opportunity to do something memorable,” his childhood coach Tarak Sinha told TOI on Tuesday. “Even after his knock in Sydney last week, he said he regretted not carrying on and finishing the job.”

Record-breaking India clinch Australia Test series in Gabba thriller

Record-breaking India clinch Australia Test series in Gabba thriller

There was an underlying restlessness in Indian cricket to see him filling the void created by Dhoni. He was panned for sticking to his ‘natural’ game. All of it started playing in his mind. It was as if he had no place in the team if he couldn’t finish games. Then the team management accused him of not knowing the difference between being carefree and careless.

This is when Pant tried to alter his game. “He kept saying he has to become a finisher. He became conscious about getting out. It meant he lost his bat swing and that resulted in him losing his natural ability to hit big,” Sinha said. Last year, Sinha and fellow coach at Sonnet Devendra Sharma arranged hitting sessions for him to rediscover his bat swing. “We kept telling him to take one Test at a time. Set short targets for himself but do not sacrifice your game of hitting big,” Sinha added.
Within two months of the ‘careless’ comment, Pant slowly lost his place in all three formats. It was a lonely walk to redemption for him. The little tip seems to be paying off. Skipper Ajinkya Rahane and head coach Ravi Shastri implied that Pant was always determined to hunt down the target and the team let him be. Perhaps, the team management has come around and taken the leash of expectations off him.

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IN PICS: India win Gabba thriller, claim Test series 2-1

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<p>Rishabh Pant unleashed a Twenty20-style batting assault to blast India to an incredible three-wicket win in the fourth Test decider on Tuesday. (Getty Images)</p>

On Tuesday, Team India head coach Ravi Shastri described Pant as a ‘good listener’. “He realizes what’s his natural game. But he needs to strike a balance between caution and aggression. Nobody wants to curb his natural game as a coach but you can be reckless sometimes. This game teaches you to learn and he has shown it in both the Test matches. He was disappointed that he got out for 97 in Sydney. He learnt from that and he made sure he was there at the end today,” Shastri said.
It’s not that he didn’t miscue his heaves on Tuesday. He plays a high-risk game but that’s how his game is built. Pant claims he had to discipline himself when it came to shot selection because of the tricks the fifth day pitch played.
It’s a given he will play heart-in-the-mouth, edge-of-your-seat cricket. He is now willing to play the uninhibited brand of cricket irrespective of the consequences. Perhaps, it’s time he is embraced for what he is. Tuesday’s knock is exactly the reason why the legends of the game across the world want to see more of him. It’s time to build trust. This Test series was a small but a significant step towards that.


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Against all odds, India rise to the occasion to hand Australia their first defeat in 32 years at the Gabba

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Fortune favours the brave. What else can one say after watching an injury-ridden, heavily-depleted Indian side beating a full-strength Australia at their home in a Test series?

That after losing the opening Test in a humiliating manner. That after their captain returned home to attend more important matters. That after losing all their first-choice bowlers. Brave.

On December 19, 2020, India suffered the worst batting collapse of their cricket history as they got out for just 36 runs in the first Test at the Adelaide Oval.

Exactly one month later — on January 19, 2021 — India chased down a record total to win the fourth Test and scripted an epic come-from-behind series victory to retain the Border-Gavaskar Trophy. Brave.

“This is the toughest tour ever. Nothing comes closer to this. This surpasses all,” India coach Ravi Shastri said after the win to emphasize the importance of this win.

Somehow, it was befitting that India clinched the series (2-1) at the Gabba, a ground that has been a fortress for the Australians. Any other ground would not have done justice to India’s efforts in the series where they have defied all odds, including handing Australia their first defeat in 32 years in Brisbane.

For, how do you make a strong, impactful closing statement than beating your opponent in their stronghold.

Australia were eager to play at the Gabba for obvious reasons — 0 losses in last 31 Tests. They wanted the series to begin in Brisbane but that didn’t happen. When India were trying to salvage a draw in Sydney, Tim Paine famously told Ravichandran Ashwin, “Can’t wait to get you to the Gabba, Ash.”

Going into the fourth innings, with the pitch starting to throw up surprises, aiming for a draw seemed more sensible than going after the target — 328. No team had ever scored more than 236/7 to win a Test at the Gabba.

But this is new India, as Virat Kohli had said before the series, it “takes up challenges and is filled with optimism and positivity.”

A superb 91 by Shubman Gill, a dogged 56 by Cheteshwar Pujara and the most crucial 89 not out by Rishabh Pant took India home with three wickets to spare.

Somehow, it was befitting that Pant, considered an irresponsible batter, saw through India’s tricky chase and hit the winning runs.

Both India and Pant have a past where they have erred in fulfilling the expectations. But on Tuesday, Pant ensured that India exceeded the expectations with a responsible knock on a fifth-day pitch.

Pant has been accused of throwing away his wicket on many occasions. Chinks in his keeping have been given as reasons to drop him in favour of a better keeper. With two brilliant knocks in two consecutive matches, he has proven his match-winning credentials (he scored 97 in India’s second innings in Sydney).

“I think this is one of the biggest things in my life right now,” Pant said after the match.

Somehow, it was befitting that a side whose members endured personal loss (Mohammed Siraj lost his father ahead of the series), faced racist abuse, missed their best personnel and received body blows ended up on the winning side.

Indian squad had gone through such a drastic depletion due to injuries that they went out to play this match with a bowling attack that had a collective experience of four matches (including Shardul Thakur’s first appearance where he got injured after bowling just 10 balls) and a collective wicket count of just 11.

The opposition had bowlers with a collective wicket count of over 1000. On paper, there was no match. On ground, however, it turned out to be a different story.

“India deserves full credit, they have been outstanding. We will learn a lot of lessons from this,” Australia coach Justin Langer told 7 Cricket. “You cannot take anything for granted, never ever underestimate the Indians, 1.5 billion [people in India] and you play in the senior team, you have to be really tough. I couldn’t appreciate India enough.”



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