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Google today announced IT admins can now apply policies to Chrome on Android and iOS, in addition to Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS. This means they can, for example, use the Google admin console to set bookmarks through the Managed Bookmarks setting, set the Proxy policy or the Password Manager policy, across all six platforms at once. It’s important to note that Google warns this is an “experimental feature.” As a result, admins are told to inform their users before flipping the switch, as well as to report any issues via

In other words, enabling the new Mobile setting (Chrome Management needs to be turned on first) means that all supported policies (check the lightbulb beside each policy to see if it will on Android and iOS) will apply to Chrome on mobile devices. All users who are signed in to Chrome for mobile with their organization’s account will receive whatever user settings the administrator has set.

Eric Piermont/Getty Images

Image credit: Picjumbo.com

It’s important to note that Google warns this is an “experimental feature.” As a result, admins are told to inform their users before flipping the switch, as well as to report any issues via In other words, enabling the new Mobile setting (Chrome Management needs to be turned on first) means that all supported policies (check the lightbulb beside each policy to see if it will on Android and iOS) will apply to Chrome on mobile devices.

All users who are signed in to Chrome for mobile with their organization’s account will receive whatever user settings the administrator has set.

PayPal today announced partnerships with three leading Bitcoin payment processors: BitPay, Coinbase and GoCoin. The eBay-owned company wants to help digital goods merchants accept Bitcoin payments, although it is starting with those located in the US and Canada first (“We are considering expanding to other markets,” a PayPal spokesperson told TNW. “Stay tuned.”)

Image credit: Picjumbo Free Images

Image credit: Picjumbo Free Images

PayPal says it chose to integrate the third-party functionality directly in the PayPal Payments Hub because the aformentioned trio already offers its customers protections when dealing with the virtual currency. The company envisions anything that can be obtained digitally, such as video games and music, being sold in Bitcoin.

Image credit: Picjumbo Free Images

Image credit: Picjumbo Free Images

This is important to emphasize, because PayPal isn’t adding Bitcoin as a currency to its own digital wallet. It also won’t be processing Bitcoing payments on its secure payments platform: everything is being handled by one of the three third-parties.

Merchants who pre-sell products, meaning asking for money up-front for a product or service that will be delivered in the future, will also not be supported. This is, according to PayPal, to safeguard customers from businesses that can’t give refunds if they fold before the product is shipped and after buyer protection expires.

In other words, the company is starting to accept Bitcoin, but very slowly and very cautiously. PayPal Senior Director of Corporate Strategy Scott Ellison explains.

Prev1 of 3
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse

Google today announced IT admins can now apply policies to Chrome on Android and iOS, in addition to Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS. This means they can, for example, use the Google admin console to set bookmarks through the Managed Bookmarks setting, set the Proxy policy or the Password Manager policy, across all six platforms at once. It’s important to note that Google warns this is an “experimental feature.” As a result, admins are told to inform their users before flipping the switch, as well as to report any issues via In other words, enabling the new Mobile setting (Chrome Management needs to be turned on first) means that all supported policies (check the lightbulb beside each policy to see if it will on Android and iOS) will apply to Chrome on mobile devices. All users who are signed in to Chrome for mobile with their organization’s account will receive whatever user settings the administrator has set. Image credit: Picjumbo.com It’s important to note that Google warns this is an “experimental feature.” As a result, admins are told to inform their users before flipping the switch, as well as to report any issues via In other words, enabling the new Mobile setting (Chrome Management needs to be turned on first) means that all supported policies (check the lightbulb beside each policy to see if it will on Android and iOS) will apply to Chrome on mobile devices. All users who are signed in to Chrome for mobile with their organization’s account will receive whatever user settings the administrator has set. PayPal today announced partnerships with three leading Bitcoin payment processors: BitPay, Coinbase and GoCoin. The eBay-owned company wants to help digital goods merchants accept Bitcoin payments, although it is starting with those located in the US and Canada first (“We are considering expanding to other markets,” a PayPal spokesperson told TNW. “Stay tuned.”) Image credit: Picjumbo Free Images PayPal says it chose to integrate the third-party functionality directly in the PayPal Payments Hub because the aformentioned trio already offers its customers protections when dealing with the virtual currency. The company envisions anything that can be obtained digitally, such as video games and music, being sold in Bitcoin. Image credit: Picjumbo Free Images This is important to emphasize, because PayPal isn’t adding Bitcoin as a currency to its own digital wallet. It also won’t be processing Bitcoing payments on its secure payments platform: everything is being handled by one of the three third-parties. Merchants who pre-sell products, meaning asking for money up-front for a product or service that will be delivered in the future, will also not be supported. This is, according to PayPal, to safeguard customers from businesses that can’t give refunds if they fold before the product is shipped and after buyer protection expires. In other words, the company is starting to accept Bitcoin, but very slowly and very cautiously. PayPal Senior Director of Corporate Strategy…

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Apple Chinese users are mainly snapping up iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro

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Apple’s launch promotional material of the New iPhone12 Pro seen displayed on a mobile phone screen with an Apple logo in the background.

Pavlo Gonchar | LightRocket | Getty Images

GUANGZHOU, China — Chinese consumers have taken a liking to Apple’s new iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro, according to data provided to CNBC.

The two devices in Apple’s new 5G flagship lineup became available for pre-order on Oct. 16. As of 9:30 a.m. China time on Tuesday, 152,737 iPhone 12 units had been pre-ordered, data from Chinese e-commerce site and authorized Apple reseller Fenqile showed.

Fenqile is also taking pre-orders for the iPhone 12 Mini and iPhone 12 Pro Max, even though they’re not officially available until November.

Out of all the pre-ordered iPhones, nearly 43% are iPhone 12 models and over 28% are iPhone 12 Pro models. Just under 19% are iPhone 12 Pro Max orders and nearly 10% are orders for the iPhone 12 Mini, the device with the smallest screen in the lineup.

The Fenqile data comes after a new note from Ming-Chi Kuo, an analyst at TF International Securities, known for his accurate predictions on Apple products and sales.

Kuo reported that Apple sold up to 2 million iPhone 12 units in the first 24 hours, up from 800,000 units of the iPhone 11. He also said that iPhone 12 Pro sold better than expected and that China represented 35% to 45% of that model’s demand.

Indeed, on Apple’s official China website, the iPhone 12 Pro had a delivery time of three to four weeks, higher than the two to three weeks for the base iPhone 12 models. Delivery times for devices can often indicate which models are most popular.

Kuo also predicted that the iPhone 12 Mini wouldn’t sell well in China due to its smaller screen, in a market where larger displays are more popular. On Fenqile, the iPhone 12 Mini has the least amount of pre-orders.

The latest figures will be encouraging for Apple given the importance of the Chinese market to the company but also the high expectations that the iPhone 12 range will spur an upgrade “supercycle.”

Apple’s iPhone 12 64GB in blue makes up 20% of pre-orders on Fenqile with the iPhone 12 Pro 128GB Pacific Blue variant making up 11%. These are the two most popular models.

The Cupertino, California giant has been quite aggressive on pricing. The iPhone 12 Pro is cheaper than last year’s iPhone 11 starting price upon release in China.

“Consumers are looking for the best deal now, even before the pandemic. And both the iPhone 12 and 12 Pro models could provide them favorable prices and screen size experience,” Will Wong, research manager at IDC, told CNBC.

“The iPhone 12 allows consumers to get the first 5G iPhone with more acceptable prices and specs, while iPhone 12 Pro could provide the ‘Pro’ experience to consumers with more affordable prices too.”


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Why won’t Virgin Media complete my broadband installation? | Money

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I have been trying to switch to Virgin broadband because it is by far the fastest in my area. The installation was booked for mid-August and, as at that point a full connection was not possible, we were connected to our neighbour’s cable with their consent.

Since then, Virgin Media claims it is unable to complete my installation or deal with problems with the service. Apparently its system shows the installation as complete and our account as active. In addition, the company has repeatedly failed to phone when promised, turn up in the agreed time slot, arrive at the right address or provide any explanation for anything. I am unsure what to do next, other than to send another complaint.

HB, Birmingham

Virgin Media told us it had to wait for a permit, which delayed completion of the required works, but it should have communicated this to you. It has now done this and installed cables direct to your property so your broadband service is up and running.

Having checked the quality of your connection and where you had blackspots, it offered to send wifi boosters, but you have declined and plan to buy your own. The company has written to you to apologise and offered to credit your first three months’ worth of bills. In addition, it has offered you £30 credit as a gesture of goodwill for the time taken to resolve this issue, which you have accepted.

A Virgin Media spokesperson said: “We apologise to HB for her poor experience and the delay in installing her services. We have now completed her installation and credited her account as a gesture of goodwill.”We welcome letters but cannot answer individually. Email us at [email protected]. Please include a daytime phone number. Submission and publication of all letters is subject to our terms and conditions: http://gu.com/letters-terms


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U.S.-China tensions could split the internet — and data will play a key role

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China’s President Xi Jinping (L) and US President Donald Trump attend a working session on the first day of the G20 summit in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 7, 2017.

Patrick Stollarz | AFP | Getty Images

GUANGZHOU, China — Political tensions between the U.S. and China have thrust technology and supply chains into the spotlight and threaten to fracture the internet.

Over the past few years, a growing chorus of voices have predicted a so-called splinternet, the idea that a kind of two-track internet could appear — one led by the U.S. and one by China.

While there is no unified definition of the splinternet, experts told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast, that data is going to play a key part in the scale of any kind of fracturing of the internet that we use today.

“I think the data issue and data governance issue is really going to be the critical thing here in terms of how far … we get a split, splinternet, or some fragmentation of cyberspace,” Paul Triolo, head of the geo-technology practice at Eurasia Group said.

To some extent, the split in the global internet can be seen already. For a while, China has effectively blocked many American technology companies such as Google and Facebook from operating there. In China, the apps people use are very different. Instead of Amazon, there is Alibaba-owned Taobao or JD.com. WeChat is the messaging app of choice for over a billion people. And Beijing forces technology companies to censor content deemed politically sensitive.

But this is just one layer. Having to use different apps is manageable. The splintering of the internet could go deeper to areas such as standards — rules that allow some technologies to work together globally — and data transfer. The latter is one of the most important points and data governance is one area of friction between countries around the world.

Data governance differences

The U.S.’s campaign against Chinese technology companies has focused on accusations that they represent a national security threat because of the way they could handle American users’ data.

For example, in his Aug. 6 executive order threatening to ban social media app TikTok, President Donald Trump said the service collects “vast swaths of information” on Americans which could get into the hands of the Chinese Communist Party.

TikTok is owned by Beijing-based ByteDance. The company has repeatedly denied these claims. But the Trump administration has forced TikTok to come to an agreement which will see Oracle handle American user data to ensure it is not transferred anywhere. That agreement has not been finalized and details are scarce.

This is an example of data localization — where the data of a country’s citizens needs to be stored and processed there. This happens in China too.

But it’s not apparently competing nations and regions where there are frictions over data governance. The European Union, which has moved to regulate data collection and processing practices of companies operating in the bloc, is also at odds with the U.S.

The EU and U.S. had an agreement known as the privacy shield. This is a framework to provide companies on both sides of the Atlantic with a mechanism to comply with data protection requirements when transferring personal data from the European Union and Switzerland to the United States. This agreement is used by thousands of companies. 

But the European Court of Justice, the EU’s top court, struck the agreement down earlier this year, saying that it does not adequately protect the privacy of European citizens. The concern in this case focused on some of the laws the U.S. has around surveillance of its citizens. The court was concerned that U.S. law fails to protect people’s personal data from government surveillance in the same way European law does.

‘Club of democracies’

Such fragmentation around data governance principles could lead to factions being created, according to Triolo. He said that he expects the EU and the U.S. to patch up their differences and essentially “get together and … set new standards around data.”

“Any effort to do that will be perceived by China and other countries like Russia as an attempt to exclude counties from a sort of club of democracies that are trying to sort of set the new rule around data,” Triolo said.

“But there does seem to be a lot of momentum behind this because of this fear in many countries that there needs to be at least a common approach to how governments access data … and then the sense that there has to be really high standard around privacy. Then countries that meet that then would be part of the club.”

These new standards could be hard for the likes of Russia and China to meet, according to Triolo.

“And so even though it could be spun as we are setting higher standards and then China needs to meet those, it will be really seen I think as an attempt to really split the internet,” he said.

That could lead to companies operating in the U.S. and Europe under strict data protection standards finding it difficult to operate in China and ultimately pulling out.

“So that process I think is somewhat inevitable over the next several years. This is going to take time, it’s not going to be easy, like switching off a light,” Triolo added.

‘Data neutral epicenters’

Stricter rules around data flows could lead to so-called data neutral epicenters, according to Abishur Prakash, a geopolitical specialist at the Center for Innovating the Future (CIF), a Toronto-based consulting firm.

He referenced the TikTok deal that is still being negotiated. As it stands, a new U.S.-based entity called TikTok Global will be set up. Oracle and Walmart will own 20% of that. ByteDance said it will own the remaining 80%. Oracle however contests that ByteDance will have “no ownership” of TikTok Global. 

ByteDance said it will not transfer its algorithm or technology to Oracle as part of the deal.

Prakash said that could mean at some point, ByteDance’s algorithm has to access the data in the U.S., even though the whole point of the deal is to stop American data from interacting with China.

This could mean that some countries begin to play a middle-man role.

“This then leads to the geopolitical possibility that we are now going to have what I call, data neutral epicenters, that we are going to have certain nations, such as … Singapore or the UAE, that become neutral settings where nations store data, certain types of data, that can then be accessed by other countries and companies,” Prakash told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley.”


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