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Chinese video platform Bilibili files for Hong Kong listing

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The Bilibili booth is pictured during the 2019 Yangtze River Delta International Cultural Industries Expo at National Exhibition and Convention Center on November 21, 2019 in Shanghai, China.

Gao Yuwen | Visual China Group | Getty Images

GUANGZHOU, China — Chinese video platform Bilibili has confidentially filed for a secondary listing in Hong Kong, a source close to the matter told CNBC.

Bilibili, which is currently listed on the Nasdaq, made the filing within the last few days, the source said.

CNBC reported last week that the listing could raise over $2 billion and the filing was to be expected last week or beginning of this week.

Companies already listed on another major exchange can confidentially file for a secondary listing on Hong Kong’s stock exchange as a way to prevent a major impact on its share price. The filing is not public yet.

Pricing details usually follow in the coming weeks.

A Bilibili spokesperson was not immediately available when contacted by CNBC.

Bilibili will be the latest U.S.-listed Chinese firm to flock to Hong Kong for a secondary listing. AlibabaJD.com and NetEase have all taken the same route over the last 14 months.

Continued tensions between the U.S. and China have threatened Chinese firms listed on Wall Street. In December, President Donald Trump signed legislation that threatened to delist firms that don’t comply with American auditing standards.

That could be one reason behind the rise of secondary listings in Hong Kong.

The video platform is aimed at China’s younger generations and mobile games is its largest revenue driver. Bilibili also hosts live broadcasts during which users can buy virtual items. It also makes money from advertising.


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Malware reportedly found on laptops given to children in England | Education

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An investigation has been launched into reports that some of the laptops handed out to vulnerable children for homeschooling in England are infected with malware.

According to an online forum, teachers from a school in Bradford noticed the issue and believe it contacts Russian servers.

“Upon unboxing and preparing them it was discovered that a number of the laptops are infected with a self-propagating network worm (Gamarue I),” the forum message says.

Gamarue I, identified by Microsoft in 2012, is a worm capable of downloading files on to a PC. According to the tech firm, it can be installed when a spam email attachment is opened and can also copy itself to any USB flash drives connected to the computer.

The Department for Education (DfE) said it was looking into the problem as a matter of urgency but did not think it was widespread. “We are aware of an issue with a small number of devices,” a spokesperson said.

“And we are investigating as an urgent priority to resolve the matter as soon as possible. DfE IT teams are in touch with those who have reported this issue. We believe this is not widespread.”

The government has committed to giving 1.3m laptops and tablets to poorer children during lockdown, with more than 800,000 of these delivered already.

Brian Higgins, a security specialist at Comparitech, said: “Whilst it is unclear where these particular laptops were sourced, it is absolutely vital that anyone seeking to source devices, whether they are bought using sponsorship or donated directly, be fully aware of the risk that they may contain dormant or active malicious software and research appropriate methods to make them safe before they are distributed to homes and families.

“The potential for malicious software to be used against recipients is not limited to the children for which the devices are intended, as access to the internet will no doubt be useful for other family and friends outside of school hours.

“I would highly recommend that anyone distributing devices include some information about online safety.”


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Thumb injury forces video gamer to retire

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Attendees play the Call of Duty: Black Ops III game by Activision Blizzard during the E3 Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles, California.

Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

A 25-year-old professional video gamer has been forced to retire due to a thumb injury.

Thomas “ZooMaa” Paparatto announced he’s “taking a step back from competitive Call of Duty” on Twitter.

“This is the hardest thing I’ve ever had to write, I am stepping down and will no longer compete in competitive Call of Duty for the foreseeable future,” he said in a separate blog post.

“It breaks my heart to step away from a game I put my heart and soul into every single day for eight years,” he added. “Tearing up just writing this, but I don’t know what else to do at this point.”

Paparatto plays for an esports team called New York Subliners and he has earned $387,019 from 87 tournaments, according to Esports Earnings. His largest prize from a single tournament came in April 2018, when he won $53,125 in a Call of Duty: Cold War II competition.

The U.S. gamer struggled with weakness in his thumb and his wrist a few years ago while playing a game called FaZe Clan. He had to have surgery as a result.

“Going through that process of getting healthy again was one of the hardest things I ever had to do both physically and mentally, which led to a lot of stress and anxiety,” he said. “Unfortunately, the injury has returned making it really hard for me to compete at the highest level against some of the best players in the world.”

He said that playing through the pain in his hand “just isn’t possible anymore” and that he doesn’t enjoy competing when he can’t be the “ZooMaa everyone knows and loves.”

Fans and fellow gamers shared their support following his announcement. 

Many professional gamers train or compete for over 10 hours a day, and some of them rake in over a $1 million a year in the process. However, the physical and mental strain on the body can sometimes result in health problems.  

Sam Matthews, founder and chief executive of Fnatic, told CNBC in December: “These people are fit and healthy largely, but there’s always an anomaly to the rule.”



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Samsung Galaxy S21 review: High-end version is gorgeous

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Samsung Galaxy S21 review: High-end version is gorgeous