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Bruce Willis Not Wearing A Mask In A Pharmacy

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“Be safe out there everyone.”

Bruce Willis: Big movie star, you know him from the Die Hard franchise as well as other films and TV shows.

This past weekend, Willis was spotted inside a Rite-Aid in Hollywood not wearing a mask — despite, y’know, the whole global pandemic thing.

“Be safe out there everyone and let’s continue to mask up,” he added.

Page Six also reported that Willis was allegedly asked to leave the pharmacy after being asked to wear a mask and refusing to do so.

Los Angeles County has been hit especially hard by COVID-19 in recent weeks, recording almost a million positive cases since the pandemic began. As of right now, an average of 10 people in L.A. County test positive every minute.

On average, 10 people are testing positive for COVID-19 every minute.

10-12% of those end up hospitalized, stressing our health care system even more.

Stay home. Quarantine for 10 days if you’ve traveled, are a close contact, or been at a gathering. Your bubble is not safe.


Patrick T. Fallon / Getty Images

COVID-19 cases are also currently on the rise across the United States. There are safety precautions you can take in your everyday life to prevent getting or giving COVID-19: Wear a mask, practice social distancing, and get tested regularly. Head to the CDC’s website for information about how to get a COVID-19 test in your state.

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Why are so many classic PG-rated films being changed to 12A? | Film

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In the Guide’s weekly Solved! column, we look into a crucial pop-culture question you’ve been burning to know the answer to – and settle it, once and for all

Anyone who grew up in the 1980s knew the Russian roulette thrill of watching a PG-rated film. What might have appeared tame on the surface could also contain hearts being ripped from sacrificial victims (Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom), potty-mouthed children (The Goonies), serious kink (Flash Gordon), alligators biting off limbs (Romancing the Stone), children killed by sharks (Jaws), James Bond cheerfully throttling a woman with her bikini top (Diamonds Are Forever), Sylvester Stallone taking ludicrously severe beatings (the Rocky films), or even paranormal investigators being, er, “pleasured” by departed spirits (Ghostbusters).

In recent years, though, all of the above, plus other films of that era including Out of Africa and The Mission, have had their PG certificates revoked and replaced with 12A or 12 on DVD and streaming services. Now, if an under-12 wants to see any of the risky business above, they must do so with an adult in tow. So why the change?

According to the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), these films were often classified PG at the time because the leap to the next category, 15, was too great. Conversely, some films clearly aimed at gore-happy children ended up as 15s (Gremlins, for instance, which is now a 12A). But on the whole, when introduced in the early 80s, PG covered a multitude of sins, even when censorial scissors were ineffectually deployed: Temple of Doom remains seriously dark, despite the cuts made for PG.

“Some scenes might not be suitable for young children,” was once advice parents carefully considered. If they rolled the dice and took the kids, it was on them, not the BBFC. Then, in 1989, the 12 certificate was introduced. Mildly scary blockbusters such as Jurassic Park (1993) and The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) were classified PG rather than 12 by the skin of their teeth. But when Spider-Man got a 12 in 2002, parents complained they couldn’t take their young children, resulting in local councils overruling the BBFC. In response, the BBFC trialled a 12A scheme, meaning children under 12 could be admitted if accompanied by an adult. It was a success, and the 12A rating became widespread.

The new rating effectively ended the era of cavalier PG ratings, and gave censors a new category to retroactively use for films that had previously pushed the boundaries. Today, PG has a much stricter top end, meaning a milder parental warning. So will today’s children get the same opportunities to widen their cinematic horizons? Is the BBFC’s stringent modern PG criterion an emblem for a mollycoddled generation?

In a sense, yes. The BBFC regularly surveys more than 10,000 people, then modifies classification guidelines to reflect public opinion. These consultations act as a way of making the BBFC accountable. Today it isn’t just sex, violence and swearing causing parental concern, but sexism, racism and discrimination in general, all of which could be present in PG films from less enlightened times. Besides, 12A also allows previously cut material to be reinstated (as with Temple of Doom). Hardly mollycoddling, or nanny-state censorship. But under revised BBFC guidelines, definitely not PG.


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Prominent film industry names sign letter asking for government support for UK cinemas | Film

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A group of the film industry’s most high-profile and influential names – including Steve McQueen, Bond producer Barbara Broccoli and Danny Boyle – have published an open letter calling for more government support for the large cinema chains whose businesses have been threatened during the pandemic.

The letter says that “cinema-going offers proven benefits when it comes to jobs, high-street footfall and community cohesion” but that “the need for direct financial support is pressing”. The letter is designed to support what it describes as the “larger cinema operators”, which include Odeon, Cineworld and Showcase, without whom “the future of the entire UK film industry would look extremely precarious”.

The letter adds: “We very much hope that government will respond to this call. UK cinema stands on the edge of an abyss. We urgently need targeted funding support to ensure that future generations can enjoy the magic of cinema.”

As well as McQueen, Broccoli and Boyle, the letter is signed by directors Amma Asante, Gurinder Chadha, Paul Greengrass and Christopher Nolan, producers David Heyman and Elizabeth Karlsen, and actors Jude Law and Stephen Fry.

Virtually all cinemas are currently shut across the UK under tier 4 restrictions, leading to widespread release delays and sharply reduced revenue, with box-office analyst Comscore reporting a 76% drop in takings for 2020 as a direct result of the pandemic. The larger operators have been hit particularly hard, with the disappearance of Hollywood releases and the difficulties of ensuring their venues are Covid-safe, even when they were allowed to reopen in the summer and autumn.

Phil Clapp, the chief executive of the UK Cinema Association, says: “While all cinemas have been able to benefit from general business support during this time, including the furlough scheme and a business rates holiday, many of the larger operators in particular have been required to continue to pay rental on their commercial tenancies as well as the other costs that come with running physical buildings.”

The Culture Recovery Fund has provided support for smaller independent cinemas, but Clapp says that the large commercial chains – which together generate 80% of the UK audiences – have received no specific support. “As of now, there seems little likelihood that they will be able to open until this coming March, representing almost a year of closure. The resulting ‘revenue gap’ experienced by UK cinemas means that the continued operation of many cinema venues is now in question. We are asking government to look again at the support it has provided to the sector, in particular for the larger operators.

“Given the differing nature of their business operations, there is unlikely to be a ‘one size fits all’ approach, but we are asking the Treasury to come back to the table for further discussions on what targeted funding might help ensure the survival of the industry.”


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About Some Meaningless Events review – attempted murder and the movies | Film

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Here is an intriguing, bewildering fragment of what might be called underground new-wave cinema from Moroccan director Mostafa Derkaoui: a docu-fiction shown once in Paris in 1975, but then immediately banned by the Moroccan government after which it disappeared from view, resurfacing in 2016 when a negative was found in the archives of Filmoteca De Catalunya in Barcelona.

Derkaoui and a group of other young film-makers are shown hanging out in Casablanca, in a bar and on the streets and at the port, interviewing people about what they think cinema should be doing. Long scenes in bars spool past, apparently semi-improvised, in which the film-makers and their interviewees get very drunk, among lots of other drunk people who are always on the verge of an argument or a fist fight They occasionally ask young women in the bar what they think about cinema and shamelessly tell them they are beautiful enough to be in the movies, asking for their contact details.

Then they realise that one of the guys they have interviewed, a man at the port who had claimed to be a teacher, was in fact a dockworker, who had tried to kill his boss – a mob racketeer who was taking most of this man’s pay. And so there are more long conversations (only deadly serious and sober, this time) about whether they can include this footage, about whether this makes them complicit in a crime, or whether this is not an opportunity for precisely the kind of socially engaged cinema they’ve been yearning for.

It’s not clear how much of this is real and how much fiction: the entirety of the “murder” may be a reconstruction of a real case. An interesting archive oddity.

About Some Meaningless Events is available on Mubi from 20 January.


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