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British ski workers ‘set to lose seasonal jobs’ after Brexit | Politics

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Adieu to the British seasonaire. Barring an 11th-hour reprieve, Europe’s ski resorts will soon be largely devoid of British seasonal workers.

From 1 January, post-Brexit, British employees seeking seasonal work as chalet hosts, instructors, drivers and nannies in European ski resorts will find it more difficult to obtain work.

“It’s game over unless the government makes an agreement with the EU that will mean there is a way for British staff to work across Europe in the tourism industry on seasonal jobs,” said Charles Owen, director of Seasonal Businesses in Travel (SBiT), which represents many holiday firms.

The trade body claims that up to 25,000 British seasonal worker jobs in the travel industry will be lost, many contracted by UK-based companies.

Currently, under the EU’s “posted worker” directive, any UK company can second staff to positions in other EU member states. The staff are on UK contracts, pay UK tax and national insurance and, under existing freedom of movement rules, do not need a work permit or immigration visa.

“Unfortunately, when the Brexit transition deals ends, all that ends,” Owen said. “In the future, if a British company wants to employ British chalet staff or bar staff, they would need to get a work permit in, say, France, proving a French person couldn’t do that job by advertising at an unemployment office for eight weeks to show no one wants to apply for it; then go through a minimum two- to three-month process to get a work permit; and then, once they’ve got that, the worker must apply for an immigration visa so they can enter the country – which means it’s not going to happen.”

The travel industry has been warning about the threat to British workers for more than two years. But it had been believed that this ski season would operate largely as if the UK remained part of the EU.

Under the existing arrangements, UK staff who are working in the resorts before 31 December can remain in their jobs for the entirety of the 2020-21 ski season. However, Covid has thrown a large spanner in the works as a second wave of lockdowns is rolled out across Europe.

“The chances of a ski season starting in December are diminishing by the day,” Owen said. “So firms have an unenviable choice: do they bring staff out, take a risk and hope they can get them on some kind of a furlough scheme? Or don’t bring them out and wait? It’s an absolute nightmare.”

SBiT has launched an online petition to save jobs that is being backed by many in the industry. “As someone who has worked in the ski industry for 30 years, it is heartbreaking to see the impact, the loss of opportunity and the end of so many dreams,” said Dan Fox, managing director of SkiWeekends. “We have thousands of applications for these roles – young people from every walk of life. Every year we have staff who have never even skied but have the right attitude. We employ people we believe will succeed, we don’t care about qualifications.”

Fox said he had made many friends in his 30 years in the ski industry. “And, having spent more than half overseas, I know the life-changing impact. So many of those who said ‘I’m just doing one season’ have ended up as a senior manager back in the UK. Many have created their own businesses and, between us, we have created thousands of jobs, taking people on holiday and making them happy.”

Rob Stewart, who runs a a PR firm that represents many businesses in the industry, started off as a ski instructor in the Alps 25 years ago.

“What concerns me the most is the thought that ski holidays will become the exclusive right of the super-wealthy. People like myself, from very normal backgrounds, from families that weren’t used to taking ski holidays, followed a dream by working overseas and earning money from doing something we loved. I’ve managed to make a career out of that, like thousands of others. Brexit is potentially taking those opportunities away.”


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Tesla, Dollar Tree, Carnival, Best Buy and more

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A salesman carries a Best Buy shopping basket in San Francisco, California.

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Check out the companies making headlines in midday trading.

American Airlines, United Airlines, Carnival — Airlines and cruise stocks surged on Tuesday as stocks tied to an economic recovery continued to rise after a series of positive vaccine announcements. Shares of American and United both jumped more than 9%, while Carnival led the way for cruise stocks with an 11.3% gain.

Tesla – Shares of the electric vehicle company jumped 6.4% to hit a record high as investors continue to favor the stock. The move pushed Tesla’s market cap above $500 billion for the first time on record. Shares have gained more than 550% this year.

Best Buy – Shares of Best Buy dropped 7% after the retailer sounded alarms on the headwinds from higher shipping costs, inventory challenges and lower-margin holiday sales. Best Buy also declined to provide guidance for the fourth quarter due to the uncertainties from the pandemic. The company reported better-than-expected earnings amid strong online sales in the third quarter.

Dollar Tree — Shares of the discount retailer jumped 14.1% on the back of quarterly results that beat analyst expectations. Dollar Tree reported third-quarter earnings of $1.39 per share on revenue of $6.18 billion. Analysts polled by FactSet expected a profit of $1.15 per share on revenue of $6.13 billion. Same-store sales for the company increased by 5.1% on a year-over-year basis, topping a forecast of 4.7%.

Hormel Foods — Shares of the food company lost 5.6% after missing on the top and bottom lines of its quarterly results. Hormel reported earnings of 43 cents per share on revenue of $2.42 billion. Analysts expected earnings of 44 cents on revenue of $2.59 billion, according to Refinitiv.

Abercrombie & Fitch — Abercrombie shares fell 1.2% after the company announced an early exit from four of its European flagship locations. The company said the move was part of its plan of “repositioning from larger format, tourist-dependent flagship locations to smaller, omni-enabled stores that cater to local customers.”

Ambarella — The semiconductor stock jumped 15.3% after Ambarella beat Wall Street expectations in its third quarter report. The company reported 9 cents in adjusted earnings per share and $56.1 million in revenue. Analysts surveyed by FactSet were looking for 5 cents per share and $54.1 million in revenue. Fourth quarter guidance was also above expectations.

Medtronic — Shares of Medtronic popped 2.8% following its better-than-expected earnings. The medical technology company reported earnings of $1.02 per share, topping estimates of 80 cents per share, according to Refinitiv. Revenue came in at $7.65 billion, higher than the forecast $7.1 billion.

Urban Outfitters – Shares of Urban Outfitters fell 4.8% despite its quarterly results that exceeded analysts’ expectations. The apparel retailer reported quarterly earnings of 78 cents per share, beating the 45 cent consensus estimate, according to Refinitiv. Its revenue also came in above forecasts.

— with reporting from Pippa Stevens, Yun Li and Jesse Pound.


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U.S. to test run Covid vaccine distribution networks as it awaits FDA clearance in ‘just a few weeks’

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U.S. to test run Covid vaccine distribution networks as it awaits FDA clearance in ‘just a few weeks’